Selected Publications

Devereaux, C. (2018). Educator Perceptions of the Inclusion of  Dance/Movement Therapy in the Special Education Classroom, American Journal of Dance Therapy, 38(1).

This qualitative study examined educator perspectives of the influence of group dance/movement therapy (DMT) sessions on their students’ behaviours, symptoms, and academic engagement within their special education classroom. Audio-recorded and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 educators who had observed and/or participated in their students’ group DMT sessions at one public school in an urban region in the United States. Results of the interviews revealed four overarching themes: (a) The process of a DMT session is perceived to improve regulatory behaviour; (b) DMT can meet individual needs as a part of a group experience; (c) DMT techniques and tools utilised can influence sensory systems (d) limitations in time, duration, and space may influence long-term benefits. While more research is necessary, results suggest that educators value the use of DMT within school settings to assist the children in gaining focus, modulating energy, and supporting healthy social engagement skills

Devereaux, C. (2017). An interview with Dr. Stephen W. Porges. American Journal of Dance Therapy, 39(1), 29-35.

During the 51st American Dance Therapy Association conference, Dr. Stephen W. Porges , Distinguished University Scientist at the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University Bloomington and Research Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, gave the keynote address, Connectedness as a Biological Imperative: Understanding the Consequences of Trauma, Abuse, and Chronic Stress through the Lens of the Polyvagal Theory. Post-conference, Dr. Porges spoke with this author in an audio-recorded interview, summarized portions of his address, and described the supporting neural mechanisms involved in optimizing mental and physical health. This unique interdisciplinary collaboration aids the profession of dance/movement therapy in understanding the principles for establishing safety and stabilization of the Autonomic Nervous System and, in particular, reciprocal movements with social engagement behaviors—a core mechanism in dance/movement therapy. This article is an edited transcription of the original audio.

Devereaux, C. (2017). An interview with Dr. C. Sue Carter. American Journal of Dance Therapy, 39(1), 19-26.

During the 51st American Dance Therapy Association conference keynote presentation, The Biochemistry of Love, Dr. C. Sue Carter, Executive Director of the Kinsey Institute, discussed the role of oxytocin and vasopressin in social behavior and attachment in humans. Post-conference, Dr. Carter spoke with this author in an audio-recorded interview, summarizing some of her talk and emphasizing how oxytocin and vasopressin interact in ways that help to understand the biological “dance of life.” This unique interdisciplinary collaboration aids the profession of dance/movement therapy in understanding the dance of connection through the biology of love and safety—an essential ingredient for healing and repair. This article is an edited transcription of the original audio.

Devereaux, C. (2017). Neuroception and attunement in dance/movement therapy with autism, American Journal of Dance Therapy 39(1), 36-38. doi: 10.1007/s10465-017-9249-1

During the 51st annual American Dance Therapy Association conference, this author participated in a cross-disciplinary panel “Polyvagal-informed Therapy for Trauma, Attachment and Autism” with Dr. C. Sue Carter, Executive Director of the Kinsey Institute and Rudy Professor of Biology at Indiana University and Dr. Stephen Porges, Distinguished University Scientist at the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University Bloomington and Research Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The following article reprints the author’s remarks on this panel, focusing on the intersections between autism spectrum disorder treatment and the activation of the social engagement system through attuned mobilization in dance/movement therapy.

Devereaux, C. (2008). Untying the Knots: Dance/Movement Therapy with a Family Exposed to Domestic Violence. American Journal of Dance Therapy.

Domestic violence affects not only the battered victim, but all members of the family. Dance/movement therapy, through its active and metaphorical pro-cess, can provide a new therapeutic approach to assist families exposed to domestic violence . This paper provides a case illustration of the use of dance/ movement therapy with a family exposed to domestic violence, as the primary therapeutic intervention. It is grounded in theories of attachment, on the primary hypothesis that dance/movement therapy offers not only a way to address the physical and emotional patterns of immobilization but also, as a reparative tool, it assists victims in integrating healthy self-regulatory capacities that have been stunted by trauma experienced through the body. The case illustration highlights how dance/movement therapy provided a direct approach to addressing specific symptoms of abuse that appeared in particular individuals in this family, as well as how ‘‘re-choreograph-ing’’ the family dynamics and relationships dysregulated by the domestic violence was pivotal in helping this family to learn new ways to self-regulate.